Featured Review

Each One A Must-See Indeed

Each One A Must-See Indeed

Although perhaps not the first geographic location that springs to mind when the topic of U.S. birding hot spots arises, the northwest corner of the lower forty-eight states is truly an under-appreciated wonderland of bird species. Encompassing as it does a wide range of habitat types – from sage-covered high desert and alpine meadows to temperate rain forests and both rocky as well as sandy seashores – in a reasonably compact area, the Pacific Northwest is home to a number of birds found nowhere else in the country.

Not surprisingly, bird watchers local to the area are understandably proud of their area’s birdlife and are generally very enthusiastic to share it with others, a regional trait exceptionally well exemplified by Sarah Swanson and Max Smith in their new book Must-See Birds of the Pacific Northwest; 85 Unforgettable Species, Their Fascinating Lives, and How to Find Them. Keep reading…

Recent Book Reviews

Some Can Still Be Saved

Some Can Still Be Saved

It’s widely known among bird watchers as well as general naturalists – both amateur and professional alike – that for as long as humans have been making scientific studies of bird populations, there has been a marked decline in the numbers of many species and an outright disappearance of far more than might be thought ecologically healthy for the planet. However what is not nearly as well known are the circumstances surrounding many of these declines and extinctions. For one thing, contrary to what might commonly be assumed, not all of them are directly the result of human activity, nor are they always irreversible. Keep reading…

Bob Pyle’s Beautiful Iris

Bob Pyle’s Beautiful Iris

For as many books as Robert Michael Pyle has written, for all the poems of his I’ve read in various periodicals – as well as those I’ve heard him weave into the many talks I’ve heard him deliver, I was astonished to learn that until the publication of Evolution of the Genus Iris his name had not graced the cover of a book dedicated entirely to his poems. Not that he hasn’t written sufficient verses to fill an entire bookshelf with such tomes… Indeed, many – including myself – would argue that his prose often approaches poetry in its lyrical playfulness. Keep reading…

Newly Noted Books

RSPB Handbook of British Birds, Fourth Edition

RSPB Handbook of British Birds, Fourth Edition

With a publication date timed to coincide with the 125th anniversary of its namesake organization, the fourth edition of the RSPB Handbook of British Birds by Peter Holden and Tim Cleeves includes detailed profiles of the 270 most common bird species found in Britain and Ireland as well as slightly shorter entries addressing 26 additional(…)

Field Guide to the Street Trees of New York City

Field Guide to the Street Trees of New York City

Like any good naturalist, whenever I go traveling, or even when I’m just strolling around my own hometown, I often find myself examining the flora and fauna surrounding me. However when visiting large cities, this can sometimes be tricky, particularly in the flora category as so many different species – both native and non-native –(…)

The Double-crested Cormorant

The Double-crested Cormorant

As with any species that finds itself competing with humans for food, habitat, or any other of life’s necessities, the Double-crested Cormorant is often seen as a pest. However when their life history is closely examined and explained, as it is in The Double-Crested Cormorant; Plight of a Feathered Pariah by Linda R. Wires, they may(…)

Nature Guide to the Victoria Region

Nature Guide to the Victoria Region

With summer in full swing, many people are heading off for vacation. For those of us in the Pacific Northwest, that often means Vancouver Island, particularly beautiful Victoria and its surroundings.

Evolution of the Genus Iris

Evolution of the Genus Iris

Just about the time I was beginning to become concerned that I hadn’t recently heard of a new book by Robert Michael Pyle, news reached me of the publication of Evolution of the Genus Iris, his first book of poetry.

Two From Princeton University Press

Two From Princeton University Press

Two new books on natural history subjects are being released this week from Princeton University Press: The Amazing World of Flyingfish by Steve N. G. Howell, and A Sparrowhawk’s Lament: How British Breeding Birds of Prey Are Faring by David Cobham with Bruce Pearson and a foreword by Chris Packham.

Sharks: The Animal Answer Guide

Sharks: The Animal Answer Guide

Fascinating as the 1,300-odd species of sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras are, they are still unfortunately among the most popularly misunderstood creatures on the planet. Television and movies, far from harnessing those powerful media’s immense communicative power to help alleviate this problem generally only make it worse.

Beetles of Eastern North America

Beetles of Eastern North America

From a footnote to the article “Homage to Santa Rosalia or Why Are There So Many Kinds of Animals?” by G. E. Hutchinson as published May-June, 1959 edition of The American Naturalist:

The Book of Eggs

The Book of Eggs

Since the amateur practice of oology became widely illegal, most bird watchers and amateur naturalists never become particularly familiar with the many fascinating things about bird eggs.

The Well-equipped Naturalist

Opticron BGA Classic 7x36mm Binocular

Opticron BGA Classic 7x36mm Binocular

Smaller than a conventional full sized binocular but larger than both compact and the increasingly ubiquitous 32mm objective “mid-sized” models, the BGA Classic 7x36mm breaks from both the magnification and objective diameter conventions to provide a highly versatile binocular that is well-suited as both a primary a well as a “sidekick” model.

The Leica Monovid 8x20mm

The Leica Monovid 8x20mm

One of the best aspects of cultivating a passion in any of the activities classifiable under the general category of natural history is that one is never bored. Irrespective of wherever you may be – from mountain meadow to shopping mall parking lot – there is almost certainly some item of the natural world that(…)

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Afield

Resurrection

Resurrection

As I hoisted my tripod and spotting scope up onto my shoulder, it occurred to me that it had been well over a year since I had last done so. My life had taken somewhat of a downward detour and I had ceased doing many of the things that I had for so long loved doing. They just didn’t seem important anymore – and besides, I had other more important things troubling my mind. My business had for all practical purposes failed due to uncollected customer debt, my search for more stable employment had yielded nothing but rejections, and my family life had become increasingly stressful with the progression of my daughter into her teen years and my mother into old age. Taking the time to go bird watching just seemed trivial; a waste of time. Keep reading…

Marginalia

On the Importance of Nature to Mental Health

On the Importance of Nature to Mental Health

“I got into bird watching because I discovered I could be on a murder scene and there’d be birds. So I got these little binoculars I’d carry in my pocket because I had to have some connection to the natural world – or the sane world – if I was going to do this.”

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